Concubine

Design consultation, Project management, Furniture Design

Bar Interior, Furniture Design

Completion: 2019

This project is a renovation of an existing small bar restaurant tucked away in the quaint area of Kuala Lumpur. The restaurant menu is a variety of eclectic, contemporary cuisine with an Indian twist. Drawing inspiration from the menu and the owner’s request for a chic interior with lush greens, the interior mainly explored on a fusion of materials from local handmade weaved rattan panels, solid American white oak and stone slate tiles. The incorporation of various materials, portray the blend of flavors between traditional Indian cuisine and Western cuisine. 

 

The main layout of the old restaurant is mainly maintained but some minor changes were made to improve on circulation, and functionality. Stone slates tiled floor designed from the exterior to the interior of the restaurant to introduce the external environment into the interior. This resulted in an extended dining area continuing towards the front of the restaurant entrance, creating an al-fresco area where lush tropical greens were introduced. A custom brass peacock logo of the restaurant lays on the floor of the main entrance to usher in customers. Followed by a custom designed peacock grille standing tall by the bar as a separation between the main dining area and kitchen area.  

 

The wall of the restaurant is decorated with three circular mirrors refurbished with brass and black steel frame from the old restaurant as a symbol of the owner’s fascination for rickshaws. Continuation of this symbol is reflected on the custom pendants above the bench seats and the bar counter. The details of the interior create reference from traditional Chinese motifs. There details are portrayed through certain elements on the interior of Concubine such as handmade tiles and hand painted murals on the walls. On the first floor ceiling, there are red lamps that resembles Chinese lanterns, reminiscence of old Chinese houses with hanging red lanterns. In traditional Chinese culture, it is a symbol of booming life and prosperous business, so they are usually hung on celebrated festivals.

© Pivot Studio Sdn Bhd Copyright 2017

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest